MWALLT
 
   Midwest Association for Language Learning & Technology  
      Illinois - Indiana - Iowa - Kansas - Michigan - Minnesota - Missouri      
            Nebraska - North Dakota - Ohio - South Dakota - Wisconsin 

 
Illinois - Indiana - Iowa - Kansas - Michigan - Minnesota - Missouri
    Nebraska - North Dakota - Ohio - South Dakota - Wisconsin
MidWest Association for Language Learning Technology
 
 
 

MWALLT 2022 Conference Program and Abstracts

The conference will be conducted through the Zoom conferencing platform. Links will be provided in the days preceding the conference through emails to those who have registered.

All sessions will be recorded for later viewing by members.

Register Now to join in live on Feb 5!

Click the Session number to jump down to the abstracts for that session.

 

Stream A
Kansas State 

Stream B
Michigan

Stream C
Northwestern

8:00 CST

Welcome



Session 1

8:20 CST

(15 min)

Using Extempore for Interpreting in the Asynchronous Spanish for Specific Purposes Course

Elizabeth Langley
Fort Hays State University

Assessing Student Learning Using Nearpod and Kahoot

Wenying Zhou
Michigan State University

 

Teaching Non-Latin Script Languages Online

Esra Tasdelen
College of Dupage

Session 2

8:40 CST

(15 min)

Teaching/Learning Business English through the Use of Technology

Nalaka S. Hewage
University of Peradeniya

Games and Tools with Flippity

Shannon Quinn
Michigan State University

Pear Deck Party

Desiree Roffers
Chicago Public Schools

Session 3

9:00 CST

(15 min)

Role of Technology in Enhancing the Three Modes of Communication in an Elementary Arabic Class

Amal El Haimeur
University of Kansas

Academic Multiword Phrases In English for Academic Purposes Composition Classes

EunJeong Park    
Sunchon National University

Revitalization Through Self-Documentation: A Community-Centered Language Learning App

Brittani Howard
University of Illinois at Chicago

Session 4

9:20 CST

(15 min)

Using Technology to Teach Hispanic Dance Sessions

Chita Espino-Bravo & Nicole English
Fort Hays State University

Exploring Virtual Reality Games for Language Learning

Felix Kronenberg
Michigan State University

Work Smarter Not Harder

Desiree Roffers
Chicago Public Schools

9:40 CST

(20 min)

DANCE LESSON

BREAK

BREAK

Session 5

10:00 CST

(30 min)

Using Online Survey Platforms to Support Collaborative Rubric Development in the L2 Classroom  

Andie Faber
Kansas State University

Introducing Arab Culture Through Teaching Arab Poetry in an Online Advanced Arabic Language Classroom 

Ghada Badawi   
New York University

How to Integrate Technology in the French Language and Culture in Elementary School

Gigi Olmstead
Catherine Cook School

Session 6

10:35 CST

(30 min)

Using Microsoft Teams to Facilitate Learner Engagement Online

Emily Clark, Melissa Peterson & Marta Carvajal
University of Kansas

Using Gather.Town to Re-Imagine Interaction in Virtual and Hybrid Language Learning


Frederick Poole, Amanda Lanier & Bruna Sommer Farias
Michigan State University

Using Extempore for Interpretive Communication

Florencia Henshaw
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Session 7

11:10 CST

(15 min)

Gotta Catch 'Em All: A Game Changing Immersive Experience to Build Student Vocabulary

Andrew Walton
University of Texas at San Antonio

Cancelled

Cloud-based Multilingual Micro-content      

Kara C. Warburton
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session 8

11:30 CST

(15 min)

Digital Digital Storytelling with Japanese Exchange Students

Marina Greene
The University of Kansas

A Multifaceted Approach for Assessing Language Students in a Hybrid and Collaborative System        

Stephanie Gaillard
Brown University

Using Zoom Asynchronously: A Streamlined Way to Provide Screencast Feedback 

Jill Huang
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

11:50 CST

(20 min)

BUSINESS MEETING

(all are welcome/encouraged to attend)



12:15 CST

(30 min)

LUNCH BREAK

 

Stream A
Iowa

Stream B
Michigan

Stream C
Northwestern

Session 9

12:45 CST

(30 min)

How Sanako 1200 Unites a Foreign Language Department

Nicole Villanueva
University of Iowa

Sustainable Individualized Learning through Mini Projects in an Upper-Level Chinese Course

Qiuli Zhao Levin & Mia Li
University of Michigan

Let's Meet in vTime XR! Using Virtual Reality to Take Foreign Language Speaking Practice Beyond the Classroom      

Tricia Thrasher & Savannah Sander
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session 10

1:20 CST

(30 min)

Social Practice through Telecollaboration

Tracie L Whiting Kipper
Kansas City Art Institute

Create Online Escape Rooms for Your Students Using Google Slides and Forms

Amaryllis Rodríguez Mojica, Julie Harrell, Phil Cameron & Mia Li
University of Michigan

Bridging the Cultural Gap Through a Virtual Bilingual/Cultural Exchange Program      

Honaida Ahyad
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Session 11

1:55 CST

(15 min)

Un Dicho Bien Dicho 

Macy Maas
University of Iowa

Pronunciation in Context: Bringing New Voices to Our Classroom Through the Use of Tiktok

Becky Kato
University of Michigan

Annotation in Language Learning    

Honaida Ahyad
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Session 12

2:15 CST

(30 min)

Technology-Based Elicited Imitation as a Routine Oral Assessment

Ayaka Matsuo
Purdue University

Making Language Learning Memorable Using the FUNemployed Model

Phill Cameron, Pinderjeet Gill, & Yi-Su Chen
University of Michigan

Nearpod for World Language Teachers     

Desiree Roffers
Chicago Public Schools

Session 13

2:50 CST 

(30 min)

Break Out Boxes

Kelleen Browning 
Lincoln SouthEast High School

==================

This Is My Jam!  Using Google Jamboard and Developing Your Visual Style in a Hybrid Language Teaching Age  

Elizabeth Enkin
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Shaping Pedagogy in the Post-Pandemic World: Teaching Language Teaching Methods in a Hyflex Classroom

Robert A. Randez & Curtis Green-Eneix
Michigan State University

Playing Through Minnesotano History

Jeremy A. Robinson, Monse Barrios, Andrea Cruz & Sage Kiefer
Gustavus Adolphus College

3:20 CST

(15 min)

BREAK

Session 14

3:35 CST 

(15 min)

Adaptation of Online Class Activities for the Enrichment of In-Person Classes

Ji-Yeon Lee
University of Kansas

Class Mags: Language Project-Based Learning to Engage and Educate

Deborah Gaiefsky 
My Class Mag, LLC

Metaverse Studio 

Adetutu Fabusoro & Agnieszka Bednarz
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Session 15

3:55 CST 

(15 min)

Lengua Viva: Experience Language Through Culture

Azul Trejo Zetina & Ramona Koob
University of Iowa

Buncee: Create and Share Multimedia Presentations for Students and Teachers

Kayla Figueroa   
University of South Florida

"How are you really doing?" Using Padlet as a Social, Mental Health, and Language Learning Tool in the Classroom

Arielle Akines
Wheaton College

Session 16

4:15 CST

(15 min)

The Grammar Trials: A Quest to Defeat the Final Exam       

Kaitlyn Vote
University of Iowa

A Training Module for Learning to Use the ImmerseMe Teacher Dashboard 

Denis B. Melik Tangiyev
Purdue University

Tips for Conducting Online Writing Conferences via Zoom

John Kotnarowski 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

4:35 CST

(10 min)

WRAP UP




*** Session Abstracts ***

A. Welcome  8:00 CST (15 min)

_________________________

Session 1  8:20 CST (15 min)

1A. Using Extempore for Interpreting in the Asynchronous Spanish for Specific Purposes Course

Elizabeth Langley (Fort Hays State University)

Role-play and interpreting practice activities form an important part of classroom practice in on-campus Spanish for Specific Purposes (Business Spanish, Medical Spanish, and Translating and Interpreting) classes at Fort Hays State University. This presentation offers one solution to the issue of reinventing and adapting these assignments for an asynchronous, online environment using Extempore. I also show how the asynchronous, virtual versions of these types of assignments have, in turn, begun to influence the on-campus and synchronous iterations (the source assignments) because of the assessment advantages of the virtual versions.

1B. Assessing Student Learning Using Nearpod and Kahoot

Wenying Zhou (Michigan State University)

As Covid-19 changed the world last year, our instruction modality was forced to change from a face-to-face environment to online. This raised concerns about how we, as foreign language teachers, could engage our students in foreign language learning and how we could design formative assessments to evaluate their learning in the online environment. In the classroom, we can engage our students using many individual or group-based activities to increase teacher-student and student-student interactions. Are there any technology tools we can use to achieve the similar goal? In the face-to-face environment, we normally assess our students' learning through quizzes and exams. However, Covid-19 has made this method of assessment (temporarily) redundant. In the online environment, how can we tell how well our students have been doing? Are there any tools that we can use to design interesting and interactive formative assessments? This presentation will focus on introducing two technology tools I used to design formative assessment to engage my students and evaluate their learning in online class activities: Nearpod and Kahoot

1C. Teaching Non-Latin Script Languages Online

Esra Tasdelen (College of Dupage)

My presentation will go over the pitfalls and challenges of teaching a non-Latin script language (Arabic) online during a pandemic. I will go over some of the solutions and tech tools that I found to be useful when faced with the challenges of teaching a less-commonly taught language online.

_________________________

Session 2. 8:40 CST (15 min)

2A. Teaching/Learning Business English through the Use of Technology

Nalaka S. Hewage (University of Peradeniya)

This presentation is based on a technology-enhanced activity designed for a group of Sri Lankan university undergraduates enrolled in an online course in Advanced Business English. The purpose of the activity is to enable students to engage in a panel discussion through the use of technological resources such as Google Classroom, Zoom, YouTube, and WhatsApp. The above mentioned activity can be considered as an integrated task in that it contains a listening component as well as a speaking component. The first part of the activity requires the learners to watch a YouTube video featuring a panel discussion entitled "How can Sri Lanka reset and revive its economy while finding solutions to address a health crisis?" and answer a series of questions based on the panel discussion. The students are required to complete the above section as an ungraded homework assignment prior to the class session where there will be a discussion of the video. In preparation for the second part of the activity, the class should be divided into five different groups and a topic should be assigned to each group. One student from each group should be appointed as the moderator while the other students from that group should be appointed as panelists. Each group should then make a group call via WhatsApp or meet via Zoom in order to prepare for their own panel discussion which they are required to do during the subsequent class session. The said activity could be utilized as part of a flipped class session because it is partially synchronous and partially asynchronous.

2B. Games and Tools with Flippity

Shannon Quinn (Michigan State University)

This session will introduce participants to the online app called Flippity, which offers a number of games and classroom management tools that can be used in online or hybrid language courses. In the presentation, I will show examples of simple games that can be created using Flippity, including Quiz Show (similar to Jeopardy!), Snowman (similar to Hangman), Scavenger Hunt, Randomizer, and Mad Libs. I will also present some of the useful classroom management tools that you can create with Flippity, including a Name Picker, a Leader Board, and a Tournament Bracket, among others. Finally, we will briefly walk through how the Flippity templates work so that teachers will be prepared to immediately create their own activities and tools.

2C. Pear Deck Party

Desiree Roffers (Chicago Public Schools)

Learn how to make your World Language class presentations more fun, interactive, and effective with Pear Deck. Teachers will explore how lessons can be used for live instruction as well as independent learning through the presentation features offered by Pear Deck. They will learn about how the audio feature can be used to provide comprehensible input and how any worksheet can easily be turned into a digital activity using the drawing feature. Participants will learn how other platforms can be integrated into a Pear Deck presentation without having students toggle between tabs. Finally, teachers will learn how easy it is to use Pear Deck with any Google Slide presentation they have already created for their students. 

_________________________

Session 3   9:00 CST (15 min)

3A. Role of Technology in Enhancing the Three Modes of Communication in an Elementary Arabic Class

Amal El Haimeur (University of Kansas)

Technology can be used to enhance language instruction, practice and assessment (ACTFL, 2017). In this proposal, I will talk about how technology is used to enhance and assess interpretational, interpersonal and presentational modes. By using different platforms students are provided with differential learning opportunities which provide ample opportunities for learning. To enhance interpretational mode (reading, listening), students have weekly VoiceThread assignments. By using VoiceThread tool, students are trained at identifying and producing sounds and phrases. VoiceThread activities will enhance and assess the natural order of the Arabic system by providing a smooth transition in the following natural order: sound, word, phrase and sentences. Students also have an opportunity to watch instructor videos attached to their VoiceThread as a way to improve production and fluency. Kahoot games is another tool used to assess vocabulary and interpretational mode. For example, students are given pictures and asked to match it with the correct word. Peardeck can be used in activities targeting interpretive mode as well. For Interpersonal mode, students are involved in recording drills using VoiceThread where they have to respond to basic recorded questions. Recorded project skits can be used as a way of assessment. As for presentational mode (speaking), it can be enhanced using technology as well. For example, students are asked to respond to the instructor's flipgrid by introducing themselves. Blackboard discussion can also be used as a tool to get students together to enhance their presentational mode of communication (writing) such as describing a map or an authentic menu.

3B. Academic Multiword Phrases In English for Academic Purposes Composition Classes

EunJeong Park (Sunchon National University)

Educators would agree that we need to provide effective instruction for students' language development and improvement. Long's (1983) study found that formal instruction has advantages to L2 learners. Second language researchers have investigated the preliminary impact of input that has been purposefully maneuvered to implementing language instruction (Sharwood Smith & Truscott, 2014). The present task helps college students improve awareness of lexico-grammar through the instruction of multiword phrases from a lexical bundle list of academic corpora (Hyland, 2012) through AntConc software (Anthony, 2016) and Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), a 1-billion-word corpus of contemporary American English created by Mark Davies.

3C. Revitalization Through Self-Documentation: A Community-Centered Language Learning App

Brittani Howard (University of Illinois at Chicago)

According to UNESCO, as of 2010 at least 43% of the world's languages are endangered. As language is deeply intertwined with our collective histories and individual identities, it is important to ensure that endangered languages are documented for current and future users (Hinton & Hale, 2001). Many widely-used language-learning apps available today include courses on Indigenous and at-risk languages (Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, Mango Languages). Some specialized apps exclusively focus on individual Indigenous languages, typically for the purpose of either teaching (e.g., FirstVoices) or documentation (e.g., LIG-Aikuma). Missing from the available array of apps, however, is one that combines language documentation and language learning. This project seeks to provide both, ensuring the power of language revitalization remains in the hands of communities that speak endangered languages. App users will be able to record their own spoken sounds, words, and phrases in the app's "documentation mode". Photos and short videos can be recorded and attached to audio files, preserving language context, expressions, and gestures. Languages are filed within an in-app language tree, allowing the separation of distinct language varieties. All data can then be used in a gamified "learning mode", where other users can study through flash cards, spelling prompts, pronunciation exercises, native speaker chats, and more. My hope is that this project will help communities preserve the ways of knowing and being that come along with the way people use language to relate to one another, and to the world around them.

_________________________

Session 4   9:20 CST (15 min)

4A. Using Technology to Teach Hispanic Dance Sessions

Chita Espino-Bravo & Nicole English (Fort Hays State University)

During the fall semester of 2022, Hispanic Dance Sessions at FHSU (sponsored by Modern Languages, Spanish Club, and Sociology) had to figure out how to teach these sessions using technology to be able to continue with this extracurricular activity during the pandemic. We encountered several issues with technology (audio issues, background noise issues on Zoom, we had to figure out how to teach a dance session online where instructors would be properly seen from different angles, and properly heard. We had to make adjustments to be able to reach our online audience better. We also had very interesting positive outcomes: we taught about Hispanic diversity and got a diverse audience online; our audience would learn respect for another culture; we had a bigger outreach and inclusion of an audience who would normally not be able to make it to the campus sessions (community members and students from outside Kansas), and we received positive feedback from the audience online who felt less alone at home during the pandemic (weekly social and community connection), which made us combine future campus dance sessions with live-streaming sessions simultaneously on Zoom.

4B. Exploring Virtual Reality Games for Language Learning

Felix Kronenberg (Michigan State University)

This session is about the asymmetrical cooperative multiplayer virtual reality game Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes. In the game, one student plays the expert and the other, headset-wearing student is the problem solver. I will share pre-task activities, class observations, practical tips, and lessons learned.

4C. Work Smarter Not Harder

Desiree Roffers (Chicago Public Schools)

Come learn about how digital tools can save teachers time and increase productivity. Learn to work smarter, not harder. In this presentation, teachers will learn about creative ways to use Google Calendar, Google Keep, Google Sheets, and Google Slides to help them keep organized and be more efficient. 

_________________________

Session 5  10:00 CST (30 min)

5A. Using Online Survey Platforms to Support Collaborative Rubric Development in the L2 Classroom  

Andie Faber (Kansas State University)

Teaching students to evaluate their own work and the work of others provides them with a highly valuable skill for 21st century professional contexts. Data from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (2018) shows that there is a large disconnect between the way that employers evaluate recent graduates on essential professional competencies and the way that recent graduates evaluate themselves. One way to support students in their development of these skills is to invite students to collaborate in the creation of evaluation rubrics for class assignments, a process made easier with the use of online survey platforms, such as Qualtrics. In this presentation, we will examine some of the features of Qualtrics, such as the 'constant sum', 'multiple choice', 'matrix tables' and 'short answer' question types and how they can be used to compile student input related to assignment evaluation. Additionally, this presentation will compare use of Qualtrics with non-technological approaches and highlight the advantages of using an online platform in this setting. Regardless of whether collaborative rubrics are created with the help of technology or not, this practice supports students in the L2 classroom by making learning objectives visible, promoting transparency in the evaluation process, and supporting a democratic, student-centered learning environment.

5B. Introducing Arab Culture Through Teaching Arab Poetry in an Online Advanced Arabic Language Classroom 

Ghada Badawi (New York University)

One of the biggest challenges that any language educator encounters, while teaching Advanced courses online, is how to introduce culture. In my presentation, I will share the steps I applied, together with clear examples to implement. Following Wiggins and McTighe's Backward Design (2005), the learning objectives of my module were identified to introduce Arab culture online, through focusing on poetry and music. Then, the assessment methods were determined to vary between individual and group work, using free educational technology tools (like YouTube, Zoom, Flipgrid, Padlet and Google Docs). Finally, engaging materials were designed in a way that follows logical scaffolding, encourages collaboration among participants, uses at least one of the following modes (interpretive, interpersonal, presentational), focuses on listening, or reading, or speaking skills and varies between synchronous and asynchronous modes of teaching. Such materials are authentic and easy to be reused more than once in future courses. In addition, the same ideas can be applied to other languages. However, every time, light could be shed on a different famous poet(s). Learning outcomes were achieved when the students were able to give presentations, as well as write paragraphs, in which they listed/read the poems written by a famous Arab poet, gave examples of his poems that were sung by famous Arab singers, explored the lives of famous Arab singers from all over the Middle East, together with analyzing/ interpreting the meaning of some poems, shedding light on high frequency vocabulary and commenting on each other's presentations/ analyses of poems.

5C. How to Integrate Technology in the French Language and Culture in Elementary School

Gigi Olmstead (Catherine Cook School)

Gigi Olmstead will share student projects on how to best integrate technology in elementary school from kindergarten to 4th grade. She will present tips on how students engage and respond to technology resources with young learners.  Tools to be discussed include Pear Deck, Kahoot, Quizlet, EDpuzzle, Padlet, Seesaw.

_________________________

Session 6  10:35 CST (30 min)

6A. Using Microsoft Teams to Facilitate Learner Engagement Online

Emily Clark, Melissa Peterson & Marta Carvajal (University of Kansas)

In this presentation, we discuss the use of Microsoft Teams as a tool for the teaching of languages and cultures. We begin this interactive discussion with an overview of the Teams platform. Then, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks that draw attention to the most salient considerations of using Teams for the language classroom. By providing examples of student engagement via chat and individual conferences and calls, we demonstrate how Teams can help with teacher accessibility outside of class. Additionally, by highlighting opportunities for students to meet with each other outside of class and create their own channels, we provide practical ways to help build community and ensure peer access outside of class. Moreover, we provide insights as to the way Teams records attendance and allows teachers to call and link students to join the class thus increasing student-teacher access during class. Our examples of class activities highlight how using Teams facilitates peer feedback and student engagement. We offer suggestions on how to integrate the OneNote Shared Notebook and other applications as well as how to use Teams while using LMSs. The examples we provide come from our experiences teaching in a university-level Intensive English Program that can be adapted to fit other language teaching contexts. Participants will leave with a sense of how using Teams in a synchronous, asynchronous, or hybrid scenario is effective and what challenges to anticipate as well as specific ideas for how to implement this tool in their own varied language-teaching contexts. 

6B. Using Gather.Town to Re-Imagine Interaction in Virtual and Hybrid Language Learning

Frederick Poole, Amanda Lanier & Bruna Sommer Farias (Michigan State University)

Online and hybrid modalities challenge instructors accustomed to engaging learners in face-to-face environments. Forming groups, mingling from peer to peer, brainstorming on a whiteboard, and other familiar classroom activities are either impossible in virtual meetings or require extensive planning and instructor control. Spatial chat platforms like Gather.Town, however, support live video and text chat while simulating movement in space. Unlike other platforms, Gather.Town allows teachers to create shared, persistent digital spaces by customizing floor plans, inserting items, and embedding materials and tools. Also, areas and avatars in Gather have an appealing pixelated aesthetic reminiscent of classic digital games. These affordances enable us to reclaim many of our favorite practices, thus facilitating interpersonal communication, enhancing collaboration, and fostering autonomy. In this presentation, we will invite participants into Gather spaces to show how language teachers can use them for learner-centered and proficiency-based instruction. First, lessons designed to leverage the spatial environment can free the students to explore the digital space, group themselves, and complete tasks together. Second, pedagogically infused Gather spaces make collaborating in the digital environments, whether online or in-person, more meaningful and engaging. Finally, sharing a persistent Gather space gives students a "common ground" for assignments and social gatherings between class meetings. We will demonstrate activities and techniques that work in spatial chat and physical classrooms, provide recommendations for selecting and populating Gather spaces, and encourage participants to re-envision the use of digital spaces for online, hybrid, and face-to-face language teaching.

6C. Using Extempore for Interpretive Communication

Florencia Henshaw (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

This session focuses on a tool called Extempore, which is particularly helpful for reducing the reliance on outside help to complete asynchronous online assignments. Although Extempore is most commonly used for presentational and interpersonal speaking, the presenter will demonstrate its versatility when it comes to interpretive reading and listening activities. Examples for introductory- and intermediate-level courses will be provided.

_________________________

Session 7   11:10 CST (15 min)

7A. Gotta Catch 'Em All: A Game Changing Immersive Experience to Build Student Vocabulary

Andrew Walton (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Discover a different approach for vocabulary building with the Catchy Words AR iOS app, an augmented reality word game your students will love. Catchy Words AR allows for a hands-free immersive experience that provides a fun and active way for students to practice their spelling skills. Learn strategies on how this useful tool can engage students while building their second language vocabulary.

7B. Cancelled

7C. Cloud-based Multilingual Micro-content      

Kara C. Warburton (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

This presentation will demonstrate a cloud-based system, TermWeb, for recording the denominations (names) of concepts, objects, and other entities in multiple languages. Such a resource can be a handy tool in language acquisition particularly when students are studying language in particular sectors of knowledge. Students learn how to research linguistic "equivalents" in different languages and gain an appreciation of cultural and social differences in cognition and of the role of context in determining cross-linguistic equivalence. The resource is "persistent" meaning that it can continue to be available to students even after the course is complete. The resource can also continue to be developed by students in future offerings of the course, ultimately growing to be a substantial digital "dictionary" for the sponsoring educational institution.

_________________________

Session 8  11:30 CST (15 min)

8A. Digital Digital Storytelling with Japanese Exchange Students

Marina Greene (The University of Kansas)

This presentation shares the experience of the instructor guiding a group of advanced beginner/intermediate level ESL university exchange students through a semester-long digital storytelling project in a listening and speaking course. With the integration of technology mainly through iPhone audio and video recording, students could personalize their learning as they worked through the typical learning outcomes and language skills required of the class. With some video-editing guidance, rich stories of their semester exchange experience were showcased as final projects. 

8B. A Multifaceted Approach for Assessing Language Students in a Hybrid and Collaborative System

Stephanie Gaillard (Brown University)

This presentation will describe how, in two intermediate French courses, the Gradescope tool was trialed and implemented to assist with and enhance the assessment of students' proficiency (Davidson & Lynch, 2002; Sandrock, 2002) in the written modality.  The pedagogical considerations and practical concerns of this hybrid system will be presented, as well as a reflection on the teachers' perceptions of its implementation (Galaczi et al., 2011; Kumaravadivelu, 2003). With this collaborative way of assessing, the presenter will offer insights into its effectiveness in maintaining the validity, reliability, and fairness of the various stakeholders (Bachman, 1990; Brown, 2006) with the goal being to gather insights on best assessment practices while supporting our teachers and students (Kern 2000). 

8C. Using Zoom Asynchronously: A Streamlined Way to Provide Screencast Feedback 

Jill Huang (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Offering a variety of feedback options is a component of Universal Design for Learning (UDL)  that can help capture and sustain student engagement (CAST, 2018). Studies in second language writing  have shown largely positive student perceptions of and engagement with screencast feedback on assignments, used either in combination with textual comments or alone (Ali, 2016; Anson, 2018; Cunningham, 2019; Ducate & Arnold, 2012; Elola & Oskoz, 2016; Harper et al., 2015; Sommers, 2013). In an effort to incorporate more UDL guideline features in a university level Business Writing course for ESL students, the "share screen" feature of Zoom was used experimentally to provide screencast feedback on one assignment. The pros and cons of using this method, student feedback, and a basic demonstration will be shared in this presentation.

_________________________

A. BUSINESS MEETING  11:50 CST (20 min)

(all welcome/encouraged to attend)

_________________________

Lunch Break  12:15 CST (30 min)

_________________________

Session 9  12:45 CST (30 min)

9A. How Sanako 1200 Unites a Foreign Language Department

Nicole Villanueva (University of Iowa)

This presentation will explore the newly created CALL lab at the University of Iowa, run by the Center for Language and Culture Learning. Within this CALL lab, a specific software, Sanako 1200, is being utilized by every foreign language department and program on campus. This brief presentation will highlight how impressive Sanako 1200 is and how it has been able to benefit foreign language education in different and unique ways: from elevating pronunciation practice, to graduate level testing, thought-provoking discussion activities, vocabulary games, graduate dissertation research, and even test monitoring. Sanako 1200 is a software that encapsulates what it means to use instructional technology to grow L2 language learners into confident language users.

9B. Sustainable Individualized Learning through Mini Projects in an Upper-Level Chinese Course

Qiuli Zhao Levin & Mia Li (University of Michigan)

This presentation will discuss the development of a new curriculum for an upper-level Chinese course, "Media Chinese: Movies and Television," first taught in Fall 2021. The design features individualized learning and constant feedback from peers and the instructor: Students choose their own mini projects based on their learning goals, propose to their peers and get feedback. The instructor uses online discussion forums to help students share their learning while they work on their own projects. Students create Google Sites to showcase their work and effort in this course. This presentation will show how mini projects were embedded into the curriculum and the strategies that were employed for facilitating feedback during the class time. In addition to discussing technological affordance, the presentation will reflect on student feedback and plans for the next time the course is taught..

9C. Let's Meet in vTime XR! Using Virtual Reality to Take Foreign Language Speaking Practice Beyond the Classroom      

Tricia Thrasher & Savannah Sander (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Recently, immersive virtual reality (VR) for language learning has spurred interest among CALL researchers (Chien et al., 2019; Gruber & Kaplan-Rakowski, 2020 & 2021; Kaplan-Rakowski & Wojdynski, 2018; Thrasher, forthcoming; Xie et al., 2019; York et al., 2021). Indeed, research has found that immersing students in contextually relevant, VR environments can lead to lower foreign language anxiety and benefit learning. However, research into VR for language learning is still in early exploratory stages, and practitioners still need to know and understand how students respond to VR environments and learning experiences. 

There are already a variety of VR applications to choose from for language teaching, including several social VR platforms (e.g., vTime XR, AltspaceVR) that can be used for L2 interactions. This presentation will introduce attendees to the free social VR platform vTime XR and provide concrete examples of how it can be used for at-distance language speaking practice. Moreover, interview data from 38 (N = 38) L2 university-level French learners who completed VR peer-to-peer L2 speaking activities in vTime XR will be presented. This interview data will highlight participants' perceptions of the VR environment and activities in comparison to comparable activities completed in a traditional in-person classroom and on Zoom. Students' opinions regarding the benefits and drawbacks of using vTime XR for language practice will be discussed with the aim of providing insight for practitioners hoping to implement VR into their language classrooms.

_________________________

Session 10  1:20 CST (30 min)

10A. Social Practice through Telecollaboration 

Tracie L Whiting Kipper (Kansas City Art Institute)

Social Practice in artist education calls for collaborative experiences. Artists who are also language students develop new ways of looking at their world and gain deeper understanding of the cultural artifacts when they explore modern issues through telecollaboration. For 4th semester Japanese language students at the Kansas City Art Institute this includes a telecollaborative experience with peers at Iryo Sosei University in Fukushima. Beginning March 2021 KCAI students explored authentic resources produced during and about the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami. A month later they used Flipgrid to interact with students whose classroom is miles from the nuclear exclusion zone. Through their authentic resource research and peer interviews KCAI students created a slide presentation in Japanese that included captioning images and recording narration as well as creating a project glossary. Studying language opens the art student to new ways of thinking and seeing the world around them. This presentation looks at student work, material selection, and school-to-school coordination efforts to produce the telecollaborative document. The instructor will share methodology, lesson scaffolding, and final outcomes as well as answer questions about the experience and future projects.

10B. Create Online Escape Rooms for Your Students Using Google Slides and Forms

Amaryllis Rodríguez Mojica, Julie Harrell, Phil Cameron & Mia Li (University of Michigan)

Online Escape Rooms are a space where students team up to find hints and solve puzzles, eventually "escaping" the scenario the instructor set up. In the world language classroom setting, instructors can design a learning task requiring students to read short paragraphs, listen to songs and answer grammar questions in order to find the "passcode" to escape. In this presentation, Italian and Spanish instructors will share their escape room games. They used their games as review activities and built them using Google Slides and Google Forms. However, they each also utilized different features of Google Forms. They will discuss their similarities and differences in the presentation. 

10C. Bridging the Cultural Gap Through a Virtual Bilingual/Cultural Exchange Program      

Honaida Ahyad (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

College level language students often participate in overseas institutes to get first-hand experience with the language they are learning and its culture. Communicative skills and increased cultural awareness are two competencies language learners acquire when traveling abroad. Unfortunately, one of the most persisting problems created by the pandemic is the inability to travel. Therefore, incorporating a virtual bilingual/cultural exchange program into an existing language curriculum provides students with an inside look to the target language and culture. To provide my Arabic language students with maximum exposure to Arabic language and culture, I established a partnership with the Applied Linguistics Research Lab at Prince Sultan University (PSU). In addition to developing students' language skills and knowledge of the Saudi culture, this collaboration helped my students develop a new competence that is necessary to face future challenges, especially the ones created by the ongoing pandemic. This competence is finding alternative means of communications when other means suddenly become unavailable. My students employed different technologies such as video calls, audio conversations, and group chats to interact with PSU students. Providing students with such training is essential to help them deal with problems related to technology and allow them to overcome any stress or frustration. The virtual bilingual/cultural exchange program is a unique opportunity that brings students from around the world closer together. In this presentation, I will show how the program is designed and executed using both languages Arabic and English. 

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Session 11  1:55 CST (15 min)

11A. Un Dicho Bien Dicho 

Macy Maas (University of Iowa)

This project focuses on idioms from Spanish-speaking countries. It was made into a website where the idioms were translated into English, and have both a Spanish and English explanation of the idiom. The idioms are organized by country to make it clear where the idioms are used and what they mean in that specific country. The main page on the website stresses the importance of idiom usage in the classroom. It also explains to the reader that the idioms might differ within a country depending on region as well as across countries. It also gives a couple simple ways to bring these idioms into the classroom to help engage students in their own learning.

11B. Pronunciation in Context: Bringing New Voices to Our Classroom Through the Use of TikTok 

Becky Kato (University of Michigan)

Although we have seen a shift in the approach to pronunciation in language teaching from the nativeness principle to the intelligibility principle, we continue to see the prioritization of specific accents in English pronunciation learning materials. As perception improvement in listening often leads to production improvement in speaking, even when there is no focus on production, it is crucial to provide students with opportunities to listen to different speakers speaking in different ways, especially from groups they are likely to interact with. Research on the use of social media in the language learning classroom has suggested that social media situates language learning in authentic social/community contexts beyond the classroom, which is critical for authentic language learning where language is learned via socialization and utilization (Gee, 2004). Studies have also shown overwhelming evidence of the growing interest of L2 practitioners and scholars in social media. However, at this time, the use of TikTok in the language learning literature remains largely unexplored. In my presentation, I will share how TikTok was used in an advanced EAP pronunciation course providing input from a diverse range of English speakers. Through educational TikToks, students were able to improve the perception of connected speech by giving explicit attention to bottom-up processing. Working from example to rule, students collaborated to make generalizations about connected speech that were applied in end-of-term TikTok style presentations. I will finish by sharing instructional strategies for selecting and using TikTok videos in the language learning classroom. 

11C. Annotation in Language Learning 

Honaida Ahyad (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

In foreign language teaching, especially elementary levels, students must practice writing. Learning this skill is especially challenging when the foreign language has a completely different writing system than the first language; such is the case when learning Arabic as a foreign language. Students learn the symbols representing each letter, vowel system, writing direction, and letter connection. In face-to-face learning, students use their notebooks to write; teachers would usually circle the class and check each student's writing progress. Unfortunately, this common practice could not be sustained during the pandemic. This is a new challenge that language instructors are working to overcome. Fortunately, with the help of advanced technology, it is easier to find innovative ways to teach language skills. In my presentation, I show that using the annotation feature in Zoom is a powerful tool to teach not only writing but also other language skills and culture. Annotation builds a sense of community among students; they are able to check each other's language progress, work collaboratively, and learn from one another. Through annotation, students learn that making mistakes is part of learning. The inclusive environment fostered by annotation lowers students' affective factors such as motivation, self-confidence, and anxiety (Krashen 1986).

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Session 12  2:15 CST (30 min)

12A. Technology-Based Elicited Imitation as a Routine Oral Assessment

Ayaka Matsuo (Purdue University)

Oftentimes, oral assessments are too labor intensive for teachers to design, conduct and grade on a daily basis. Because of this, oral assessments are not implemented in routine assessments (e.g., daily homework or unit tests) as often as vocabulary or grammar quizzes are. In this presentation, I will demonstrate Speak Everywhere, a tool that can be used for Elicited Imitation (EI), an oral proficiency assessment, the validity and reliability of which are well-established in the literature. Although EI is relatively simple to conduct unlike other oral assessment methods, recent technology makes it even more user-friendly. Using an online oral practice/assessment platform, EI can easily be integrated as an oral proficiency assessment into daily language teaching, enabling teachers to create, conduct and grade the test in a simple way, and students to take it easily at their convenience. My presentation will consist of a statement of the problem (i.e. a general lack of oral assessment in language courses), a very brief theoretical overview of EI, and a tutorial/demo showing how to create, conduct, grade, and take the test. My presentation will also discuss its practicality and feasibility as a routine oral assessment based on my experience using the test as a research instrument in Japanese courses at my university. Finally, an oral proficiency unit test that I developed using EI will be presented as an example.

12B. Making Language Learning Memorable Using the FUNemployed Model

Phill Cameron, Pinderjeet Gill, & Yi-Su Chen (University of Michigan)

FUNemployed is a card game where participants play the role of interviewees for a randomly selected job. Thanks to the work of Kaizen Castanos it is possible to to play the game online, as well as "hack" the game to closely align with a variety of pedagogical goals. In this presentation instructors who have created their own versions of FUNemployed will talk about their goals, implementations, and student feedback. We will also provide a template and written instructions, in case participants would like to hack the game for themselves.

12C. Nearpod for World Language Teachers     

Desiree Roffers (Chicago Public Schools)

Learn about how Nearpod can help make your World Language classes more interactive, engaging, and collaborative whether you are in a remote, hybrid, or in-person setting. In this session, participants will explore virtual field trips, voice recording, and vocabulary games that will help students improve their language proficiency while having fun. Teachers will learn how they can make any worksheet digital using the Nearpod draw feature and share student exemplars with the click of a button. Finally, participants will play and learn about "Time to Climb," an exciting quiz game that can be easily integrated into any Nearpod lesson. 

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Session 13  2:50 CST (30 min)

13A-1. Break Out Boxes

Kelleen Browning (Lincoln SouthEast High School)

Puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? 

It came without locks. It came without tags. 

It came without packages, boxes or bags. 

And she puzzled and puzzled 'till her puzzler was sore. 

Then the teacher thought of something she hadn't before. 

What if Google could puzzle just a little bit more? 

Session will show how to use Google Forms to make online puzzles for students and break out 'boxes' that each student can use. It holds students more accountable for understanding their readings and integrates cultural information and keeps them engaged. Samples are given for German, links are available for other language groups. 

13A-2. This Is My Jam!  Using Google Jamboard and Developing Your Visual Style in a Hybrid Language Teaching Age  

Elizabeth Enkin (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

Google Jamboard is one of the newer apps available within the Google Workspace; it is a web-based and collaborative tool that can be used effectively in language teaching (Gulati & Bhatt, 2020). In keeping pace with the digital age that was brought on by global events, Jamboard can provide educators with a way to not only synchronously collaborate with students seamlessly in both remote and in-person environments, but it can also be used in these environments as an instructor's virtual whiteboard where visually stimulating materials can be created and then saved and downloaded as PDFs/images. Moreover, the creation of "Jams" pairs particularly well with other important visual elements in a course, such as a visual syllabus (Rosen, 2021), and working in virtual 3D collaborative environments, such as Mozilla Hubs, which can be valuable for language teaching (Enkin & Kirschling, 2021). This presentation will first outline the Jamboard app and some uses of it, which will then be followed by a use case of how the presenter has utilized Jamboard for a paperless flipped-hybrid Spanish linguistics course, which could be delivered synchronously online or in-person. Tips regarding using the app, incorporating your visual style into "Jams," and using the app within a virtual 3D space will also be detailed. This presentation may therefore be helpful for educators who would like to learn more about Jamboard, and it may also be useful for language lab administration, given that Jamboard can be used efficiently in a lab space with Chromebooks/tablets. 

13B. Shaping Pedagogy in the Post-Pandemic World: Teaching Language Teaching Methods in a Hyflex Classroom

Robert A. Randez & Curtis Green-Eneix (Michigan State University)

As higher education recovers from the pandemic, it has become apparent that a "return to normal" can take many forms. However, one thing is for certain; "normal" has changed along with our perception of the ideal modality for instruction. When preparing preservice language teachers, integration of technology in their practice has been discussed for years now. What about teacher educators? Technology was either our friend or foe when transitioning suddenly to online-only instruction (Sayer & Braun, 2020). What we now know, as teacher educators, is that flexibility in class modality is a skill we all must have. This talk will cover how two language teacher educators implemented a hyflex classroom modality in their language teaching methods course during the first post-pandemic semester. Hyflex is defined as a class modality that provides students the choice to engage the course either in-person, online synchronous, and online asynchronous (GCC Hyflex Team, 2019). However the student chooses to engage the course, their educational experience does not suffer. We will discuss course design, concerns that arose during the semester, student response/feedback, and recommendations for teacher educators who are interested in using hyflex in the future. Our goal is to show that the hyflex modality can be an option for teaching method courses which require students to engage in the material differently than a general education course (Vermunt et al., 2019).

13C. Playing Through Minnesotano History

Jeremy A. Robinson, Monse Barrios, Andrea Cruz & Sage Kiefer (Gustavus Adolphus College)

The current Spanish 101 curriculum at Gustavus Adolphus College takes a content-based approach, looking at our values in a number of different areas. One of the areas covered in the course is "valuing history." To support this unit, and also provide a unique tool for learning about the specific history of Latinos in Minnesota, Historia de los Latinos en Minnesota (History of Latinos in Minnesota) is currently being developed at the Culpeper Language Learning Center. Historia de los Latinos en Minnesota is a free online trivia game playable in English or Spanish which focuses specifically about the history of the Latinos in Minnesota. The game focuses on the histories of Latino Minnesotans with origins in Mexico, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Ecuador, and Colombia, which are the largest Latino groups in Minnesota. Many of the questions are based on articles by the Minnesota Historical Society (MNOpedia). An interesting feature of the game is its unique character art. The goal is that through play, students will develop their knowledge of Latino history in Minnesota (something most are probably very unfamiliar with), and when played in Spanish, also develop their Spanish language skills. This presentation will look at the context for which the game is being developed, discuss the design, development process, and demo the most recent version of the game for those in attendance. 

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Session 14  3:35 CST (15 min)

14A. Adaptation of Online Class Activities for the Enrichment of In-Person Classes

Ji-Yeon Lee (University of Kansas)

During fifteen months of remote teaching, we had to redevelop our courses for online instruction, which gave us an opportunity to practice various teaching styles and create engaging learning activities using technology. This presentation will show specific examples of learning activities developed for online classes and how they have been retained and adapted to in-person classes. The focus is on beginning and advanced level Korean language classes, and the example materials are all based on free, user-friendly online tools including VoiceThread, Google Slides, and Flippity.

14B. Class Mags: Language Project-Based Learning to Engage and Educate

Deborah Gaiefsky (My Class Mag, LLC)

Engage learners with a project that combines language acquisition, digital literacy, and Open Educational Practices - a Class Mag! My Class Mag is an educational tool designed in Google Slides and published as a digital flipbook, all for free. In this presentation, explore a complete Class Mag OER template shared openly under a Creative Commons BY 4.0 license, so you're free to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute. Attendees will explore the published version and Google Slides template; hear reactions from learners; see Class Mags in action in a variety of learning environments; and have time for questions. Additional Class Mag samples published using the template can also be viewed online. Samples include award-winning Ñ! magazine from Huron High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan that publishes original work of students of Spanish as a Second Language; T.E.E.N. Think!, a virtual collaboration with independent learners; and INFOrUS, a virtual collaboration with Engaged Detroit learners.

14C. Metaverse Studio  

Adetutu Fabusoro & Agnieszka Bednarz (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

Metaverse is a free augmented reality app where teachers and students can create unlimited experiences, on Metaverse, teachers and students can create quizzes, games and  trivia experiences. Experiences are built in Metaverse by arranging components on a "Storyboard" and linking them together. Hundreds of components can be combined to create almost anything. Metaverse is designed to make building an app easy, with no coding experience. It makes the process of designing augmented reality learning activities easy and fun. Students can remix and customize already existing apps. This can be done in a way where they can create their own quizzes for vocabulary/grammar/comprehension review, use geolocation to go on a word hunt for language learning, create stories using speech bubbles and animation, and create tours of anything (cities, schools, museums, or your neighborhood). They can also use audio narration, 360 degree images/videos, and add interactivity at each waypoint. Teachers can use this app similarly in addition to use/make apps for their classroom in order to review material and revise skills.

For this conference, we will provide a step-by-step set of instructions on how to access the tool. How people can create their  own experience and/or remix an already existing experience, discuss some pedagogical ideas and suggestions of how this tool could be used by other language teachers. We will also indicate the bibliography available; tutorials and blogs that described how it has been used by other teachers, etc.

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Session 15  3:55 CST (15 min)

15A. Lengua Viva: Experience Language Through Culture 

Azul Trejo Zetina & Ramona Koob (University of Iowa)

This project provides a technological tool for the incorporation of culture in Spanish language classrooms, designed to also facilitate the practice of relevant grammar concepts. Spanish textbooks often lack opportunities for language learners to access and understand the cultural and linguistic diversity found in the Spanish language. Since language is deeply intertwined with culture, this project aims to foster a deeper connection between the learner and the target language. This website contains culture modules pertaining to each country. To introduce cultural aspects of each country, each culture module will be connected to specific grammar objectives that are complementary to those being taught in the classroom; they include texts for reading comprehension, fill-in the blank activities, original input in the form of audio-visual media, and more. 

15B. Buncee: Create and Share Multimedia Presentations for Students and Teachers

Kayla Figueroa (University of South Florida)

Buncee is a multimedia presentation tool designed for educators and students to create engaging projects and presentations that increase interactivity. Through its drag and drop interface and extensive set of design features, it allows users to use their creativity to produce visual concepts and interactive classroom content. This technology platform can be used with students from elementary age to college age because of its varying features. As a multimedia tool, Buncee is in-part supported by both theory and research involving multimodality (e.g., Kress, 2003; Lim & Kessler, 2021). Additionally, as stated by Selfe (2017), learners may benefit from creating digital multimodal compositions because it empowers students to participate in their language learning; it engages them using technology that many students are already using outside the classroom; and it prepares them for the digitally mediated world. Thus, the tool Buncee can be used for a variety of activities, which will be demonstrated in the current presentation. Due to its customizability, teachers can use the platform to engage students with many activities such as lesson plans, digital storytelling, slideshows, and collaborative assignments. This platform includes features that make the creation of remix projects easier by including stickers, videos, music, pictures, text, and emojis. Teachers can also choose to have students participate and collaborate on classroom assignments by allowing them to express their creative freedom, which can translate to student autonomy in their language learning process.

15C. "How are you really doing?" Using Padlet as a Social, Mental Health, and Language Learning Tool in the Classroom

Arielle Akines (Wheaton College)

During the pandemic, students have expressed their mental health struggles and need to connect with peers. The use of Padlet in the [language] classroom is an easy way to check-in with students in a low stakes approach. This presentation will cover the linguistic, social, and mental-health benefits of using Padlet in the SLA classroom to build community and language competency among students. 

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Session 16  4:15 CST (15 min)

16A. The Grammar Trials: A Quest to Defeat the Final Exam 

Kaitlyn Vote (University of Iowa)

When you hear the word "adventure," what do you imagine? Whatever picture you conjured up in your head, I would be willing to bet that it wasn't a grammar classroom. To combat the monotony that often comes with learning grammar, this project strives to bring a sense of adventure to the ESL grammar classroom. Presented comprehensively in the form of a website, "The Grammar Trials: A Quest to Defeat the Final Exam" is a Dungeons-and-Dragons-inspired review game. In an effort to "defeat the final exam," students will travel to different real-world locations around their university's campus. At each location, the students will encounter a "trial" in the form of a question that prompts them to use a grammar structure that they have studied at some point during the semester. The virtual world is tied to real-world landmarks at every step of the journey, as the students must use their phones to email their answers to the instructor. If and only if the students use the required grammar structures correctly in their answers, the instructor will email the students back in real time with a clue that will allow them to progress in the storyline. The ultimate goal of the students is to be the first group to make it to the final location and emerge victorious from the "Boss Fight" against the final exam. 

16B. A Training Module for Learning to Use the ImmerseMe Teacher Dashboard  

Denis B. Melik Tangiyev (Purdue University)

This presentation will first introduce the tool of ImmerseMe, a virtual reality-based language learning program, and discuss the range of lessons and scaffolding built into ImmerseMe. Then we will briefly explore a 45-minute training module developed to help instructors learn about ImmerseMe and how to best utilize the teacher dashboard for their classroom. This training module was developed to help onboard instructors use ImmerseMe in their classrooms. This presentation will be helpful for those who are interested in learning about ImmerseMe for possible future use at their institutions or even current users of ImmerseMe who want to use a training module to help other instructors at their institution.

16C. Tips for Conducting Online Writing Conferences via Zoom

John Kotnarowski  (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

This short presentation will offer practical suggestions for conducting effective online writing conferences via Zoom including ideas and tips for scheduling the conferences, timing/sequencing considerations, and ways to communicate clear expectations before the meeting. Additionally, suggestions on how to build in opportunities for interaction between the instructor and student before, during, and after the conference will be discussed. Throughout the presentation, suggestions on how to take advantage of a variety of Zoom's features will be provided.

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Wrap Up  4:35 CST (10 min)



 

MWALLT is a regional affiliate of IALLT (International Association for Language Learning Technology), established in 1965, a professional organization dedicated to promoting effective uses of media centers for language teaching, learning, and research.

 
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